Tiger Stripes

All you need to paint is a few tools, a little instruction and a vision in your mind.

Bob Ross

Having shown off a few photos of my Tiger tank formation for LW on Facebook, a few followers have asked me how I did them.  Therefore I thought it might be useful to get down in an article.  Apologies upfront that I don’t have a step by step picture guide, this has been done rather retrospectively.

Basecoat

  • The model is primed in a light grey.  I use a matt grey primer from Wilkinsons.
  • The whole model is airbrushed in Vallejo Dunklegelb surface primer.
  • To create modulation I gradually add a lighter shade to the Dunklegelb and apply to large surfaces on the model.  Each time I lighten the colour, I spray less of the model, gradually working into the centre of panels.  I used a Life Colour Sandgrau to lighten the paint.
  • I applied camo with a 0.2mm airbrush nozzle using Life Colour Green and Rotbraun.
Yes they are Panthers but its good picture to show the modulation effect
I did the same with the Tigers, however the lighting in the picture doesn’t show it as well.

Tracks

  • Now, I hate painting tracks.  However, I have found a really simple way that works a treat. Citadel Contrast Paint – Wyld Wood.  It has the texture of a wash so is easy to paint on and really brings out the detail with only a single coat. 
  • Once the contrast paint is dry, I do a very light drybrush of Leadbelcher (GW paint – but any “gunmetal” will do).
  • Now as a fellow writer pointed out I did make a mistake with the road wheels.  While on earlier Tigers the rubber road wheels were visible, on late Tigers they weren’t.   Oh well, it’s done now.  I painted the wheels German Grey and then used the contrast paint Grypth-charger Grey as a wash/highlight.

Details

  • The wood on the tools was painted flat brown, washed with GW Agrax Brown and then highlighted with Saddle Brown. 
  • The metal was painted German grey and then had the Gryph-charger Grey contrast paint applied.  A light Leadbelcher dry brush then finished it off.
  • To help bring out the definition I used a 0.1 black liner to bring out some of the pane lines. and detail.  
  • Decals were also applied at this stage.

Weathering and toning.

  • The whole model is given a dry brush of Iraqi Sand.  This raises the detail and also feathers in the camo.  
  • Mig streaking grime was applied in thin vertical lines alongside panels, along with Mig Rust wash.  The rust wash was also applied to the exhaust pipes.  
  • Getting some foam from a blister pack, I dabbed it in German Grey, wiped it away, and then dabbed it over areas of the model where the paint would have chipped, such as corners or up the bottom of skirts.  I also hit up the decals to help blend them into the model.
Post grime and rust but before mud and filter.
  • Finally, I applied a thinned down coat (with white spirit) of Mig Yellow Filter.  This really ties all the camo, and modulation together.  Its magic stuff.  Far more subtle than a brown wash.  
  • I had recently purchased a tone-up wash from Tru Earth.  I watered this down due it being a bit strong and covered the model in it.  The effect was to make the colour subtly more vibrant.
  • With an airbrush, I then did mud effects. I sprayed Tru Earth Mud around the tracks, the bottom of the side skirt, front of the hull and up the rear mudguards.  When dried, I did the same with their earth effect.
After filter

Extras

  • I added some stowage I had lying around to create a bit of variety.  Nothing special just a base colour, wash and highlight.
  • Using bristles from a hand brush cut down to a suitable length I created antennas by glueing them into the antenna hole.  When dry I painted it black.
  • To create a bit of contrast and because I think they look cool, I made some camo nets.  These are just green thin netting cut to size and laid over the area you want. Thinned down PVA is then applied which shapes it to the model and fixes it.  While wet I scattered some tri-colour leaves over the net.
  • The final thing was to airbrush a matt varnish to seal everything on.

Category: Flames of WarGermansLate WarMid WarPaintingPainting Guide

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Article by: Mark Goddard